Church restates General Assembly opposition to Assisted Dying

The Church has restated the General Assembly's opposition to calls for assisted dying to be legalised in Scotland.

The position is set out in wake of a new consultation on the Proposed Assisted Dying for Terminally Ill Adults (Scotland) Bill launched today.

It is part of a proposal for a member's bill at the Scottish Parliament to change the law.

End-of-life-issues
The General Assembly has a long held position on end of life issues.

Lord Wallace, Moderator of the General Assembly, said: "From the outset, the Church of Scotland has followed the example of Jesus and cared for people on the margins.

"While reaffirming our privilege to care for those approaching the end of their lives and supporting the provision of appropriate care, the General Assembly has consistently and repeatedly expressed support for the status quo with regards to the law which prohibits assisted dying in all its forms.

"The current societal protection of life is clear and to move away from this would involve more than a simple modification of the law and would represent a "crossing of the Rubicon" from which there would be no return.

"This would have profound effects on how society regards those in our communities who are vulnerable, not just the elderly and infirm but also those with disabilities and those who are unable to speak up to protect themselves.

"Our position is rooted in our Christian faith and whilst we recognise that this is a debate which is not entered upon lightly by those sincerely promoting change, we remain opposed to any proposals to amend the law around assisted dying in all its forms."