Head Teacher answers Call to ministry

A Head Teacher of an Inverclyde primary school has answered the Call to become a Church of Scotland minister.

Douglas Creighton, who has run Newark Primary School in Port Glasgow for 18 months, will begin full-time study at Aberdeen University in September.

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Douglas Creighton, who has run Newark Primary School in Port Glasgow for 18 months, will begin full-time study at Aberdeen University in September. Photo courtesy of Greenock Telegraph's George Munro.

The next stage

The 32-year-old, who has been a teacher for ten years, left his post last Thursday. It was a school he “dearly loved” but he said the Call had become “stronger and stronger” in recent months.

“I love education and I love my school. It was a tough day when I had to hand the keys over,” he said.

“I loved being a teacher but becoming a minister is the next stage for me.”

Douglas grew up in Inverkip and was involved in youth work before training as a teacher 10 years ago.

He lived in Dumfries and Galloway with his wife Emma and two children, Harris (6) and Freya (2) before settling in Largs in 2014.

On top of his teaching life, Douglas was also studying to become an Ordained Local Minister (OLM) - a part-time, non-paid position - at St John’s Church in Largs.

Douglas said: "While studying to be an OLM, I always wondered if it would be possible to be a full-time candidate for ministry. That door opened and it was at this point that I thought it could be possible to become a minister.”

Become a minister one day

Wife Emma, who Douglas met at the General Assembly in 2006, is fully behind her husband’s decision.

“Emma is one of the main reasons I am on this journey,” Douglas explained. “She is now looking at setting up a child minding business to support us while I study.”

Douglas said that when he told friends of his new direction, they said “they had always thought I would become a minister one day”.

His experience as a teacher will, he hopes, stand him in good stead when working within communities in Scotland.

He said: “A church, like a school, needs to have a visible presence in a community. I have experience of supporting people of all stages – families, parents, along with children too. I was always learning as a teacher and am looking forward to learning new things that I haven’t even considered yet.”

Support from Ministries Council, Douglas said, has “always been there.”

He added: “They have all the answers to different questions – study grants, placement grants. Not simply ‘how to do it’ but practical matters too.”

Take the first step to becoming a Church of Scotland minister.

Read an article on Douglas in the Greenock Telegraph.